Archive: July 2009

Public Categories: 
  • Accessibility

I recently found one of the best descriptions of what accessibility is I've ever read. I haven't had a chance to track down the book yet, but if this chapter is an example, it's a must have for anyone in web design.

Web accessibility is about removing those barriers so that people with disabilities can use and contribute to the Web. - Understanding Web Accessibility

Go read the whole chapter, it's well worth your time.

Public Categories: 
  • Blogging
  • RSS
  • Web Design

You have your site setup properly, a beautiful design, perfect content... that's everything right? Do you have RSS feeds? Can people subscribe to your site? Quick, off the top of your head, what's your site's feed called? Do you know? What's the feeds URL? Is it available from any page in the site, or just the home page? Do you have multiple feeds? If so, where are they available from? Here are a few things you can do to make it easier for your users to subscribe to your site.

Public Categories: 
  • Accessibility
  • Web Design
  • Section 508 Compliance

You might expect a high level of accessibility from a site called Usability.gov.  You might be disappointed. Sadly, I wasn't particularly surprised by my quick look into the accessibility of this site.

Age is definitely a factor. While the copyright is up to date, the fact that has custom style sheets for Internet Explorer (IE) 5 and newer, and 4.7 and older makes me think it's not a new design. With that code, I'd hope it was more than five years old. Regardless, it's showing its age.

Some of the low points of the site are:

Public Categories: 
  • Accessibility
  • Web Design

Who cares about accessibility? The short answer is you should. If you don't, you're not alone. A lot of people don't give a lot of thought to accessibility, but they should too. Why should you worry about accessibility? For this discussion, let's leave the legal implications out entirely, they're important too, but that's another discussion. Let's just consider your audience. Who is your audience? Do you like your audience? How would you feel if I told you I was going to take some of them away? Lack of accessibility might be doing just that.